No resident of Louisiana wants to be in debt, but life is sometimes unpredictable. You cannot anticipate every financial issue that may come your way. If life circumstances lead you into debt, this does not make you a bad person. It does not justify the abusive actions of creditors, either. Today we will look at potential signs of creditor harassment so you can see if you are facing the same abuse. 

The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau delves into debt collector harassment. Some examples are rather extreme, while others may seem more subtle and benign. Many have to do with how they contact you and the frequency with which they do so. For example, they are harassing you if they call without identifying themselves. It is also harassment if they call you many times in a given day, as long as their intent is to annoy or harass you. 

More extreme examples can involve delivering verbal threats or abuse in any form. This includes obscene or profane language, insults or other derogatory remarks. It also includes threats to physically harm you or carry out other violent acts. Finally, public shaming is harassing behavior. Debt collectors cannot publish lists of people who do not pay debts. They can, however, report information to credit reporting companies. 

No one should have to live under the threats that debt collectors dole out. Those suffering from these abusive individuals may want to consider their options. For example, filing for bankruptcy can end creditor harassment. It is a valid option for those wishing to escape illegal debt collecting practices.